Legend

There are actually more than four different versions of the legend of Dumanjug, but one stood out from all the rest. For the purpose of coming up with a serious and thorough study, this writer made an analysis of the different versions and came up with the most believable and presumably precise one based on the query and the tiny bits of details as a result of the research that was conducted. 

 

The first version states that during the pre-Spanish era, a small bay along Tañon Strait (on the southwestern part of Cebu) was a village called ‘Dunggoan’ (dock or wharf). This place is now called Barangay Tangil. ‘Dunggoan’ was a sparsely inhabited area at that time. However, a few fishermen from the nearby villages would dock their fishing boats along its shoreline after a day’s catch. This explains the name ‘Dunggoan’. Eventually among the villagers in ‘Dunggoan’ was a prominent personality named Ka Doman. He had two elder brothers. They were Ka Binonga and Ka Yongyong. Ka Binonga lived in the village across the bay now called Barangay Tapon, while Ka Yongyong was a native of Sitio Panlaan in the hinterland. Ka Doman was a man of high esteem and integrity in the village. He was highly respected. He had good relations with his fellow villagers. The distinguishing feature in his personality was his big, loud, roaring voice. Whenever Ka Doman needed provisions for his basic consumption, he would shout at the top of his voice to call the attention of Ka Binonga. That roaring voluminous sound would echo in the entire village and as far across the bay to Tapon where Ka Binonga lived. Such loud echo was familiar and associated to be that of ‘Ka Doman Dahunog’, which became his pet name. Incidentally, there was a time when a Spanish officer visited ‘Dunggoan’. He heard the loud call of Ka Doman to Ka Binonga. The Spanish officer inquired from the villagers about the annoying sound. The reply was it was that of Ka Doman-Dahunog. Thereon, the place ‘Dunggoan’ was preferably known as ‘Kang Doman-Dahunog’. However, Kang Doman-Dahunog was shortened to Doman-dahunog and eventually was changed to Dumanjug for better articulation.

The second version is of the story of Roman, popularly called by his nickname “Duman”. Duman lived in the village. His tuba was the favorite of the villagers because of its excellent taste and quality. It was very well patronized by both the fishing and farming villagers. No banquet would be complete without drinking Duman’s tuba. So great was its demand that Duman had to abandon his farm, and convert his land into a coconut plantation to produce more tuba. His ‘tuba’ gathering activity would begin at dawn. The sound of his bamboo cleaners as he tapped these on the coconut palm served as a bell for the villagers to rise. His tip-tapping and its rhythmic beat marked the start of the day’s activities.

                                                                                                                               

  One dawn, the village folks were surprised when the sound was not heard. It was at this time when some Spaniards passed by the village. When the strangers asked about the place, the villagers responded, “Si Duman nahulog!” (Duman fell!) Not comprehending what the people were saying, the strangers thought that the name of the place was Dumanahug. Later, the name was hispanized and became Dumanjug.

Yet, another version has a very slight difference as to the villagers’ answer to the inquiry about the name of the place. Instead of “Si Duman nahulog!”, the villagers answered, “Si Duman nahug!” The realities in this version are quite impressive, like, tuba-making as a means of livelihood for the ancient inhabitants of the place and some details on how it is being done. Next to farming and fishing, tuba production could be the next main source of income of these ancient coastal people, and perhaps drinking it as a primary means for relaxation and merry-making. But this one is highly debatable especially because during those times it would be unusual and very risky for the Spaniards to go anywhere without them undergoing a process of briefing about everything that they have to know about the place, including its name. They would be killed by those who would not want to be converted to the Spaniards’ Christian Religion. In spite of this, this legend has been the one prevailing during the writer’s early childhood years during the 60’s and even up to the early 70’s. With the coming in of the new millennium, this story was still the one that most Dumanjuganons believed in. It is common knowledge of the people though that until very recently when most young citizens from the town are sent to Cebu City to pursue their studies and influenced usage of the city’s Cebuano is now prevalent, one would not say ‘nahug’(fell) or ‘nawa’ (lost) in Dumanjug without hearing negative remarks or seeing raised eyebrows.

The third version is just a shortened version of the first, simply because, it tells of the three brothers, whose names were Binonga, Dumanjug, and Yongyong. It also says that the place where the town now is located was once occupied by Kang Dumanjug.

The fourth and the last version, so far, came out during an interview with Mr. Anacleto Lumapas Flores on March 4, 2009 based on his well-remembered folktales during the 1940’s. It tells of one stormy night with a Chinese sea trader on his large sailboat along the southwestern coast of the Province of Cebu encountering the rough sea with its big waves.The Chinese noticed that one of his men, named Roman, fell to the unruly waters. As he shouted aloud with “Duman na huk!” it was too late because the man was already far, while the boat was sailing fast. In the seashore is where Roman was found unconscious. From that time on, that part of the island of Cebu was called by everyone “Dumanjuk”, until the Spaniards came and changed it to “Dumanjug”.

There are other different versions of the different original versions but all four primary stories put together would show a clearer picture of how the name Dumanjug came to be:

During the pre-Spanish era, a small bay on the southwestern part of Cebu Island along

Tañon Strait was a village called Dunggoan. This place is now called Barangay Tangil.

Even during the time when Chinese traders and other merchants from the different parts of the world, frequently using the safer route coming from Mindanao, Sulu Sea, Palawan, and Negros; or from the north to the south passing through the Visayan Sea between Masbate, Panay Island, Samar and Leyte through the Tañon Strait, Dunggoan was a sparsely inhabited area. However, a few fishermen from the nearby villages would dock their fishing boats along its shoreline after a day’s catch, hence, the name Dunggoan (pier).

Eventually among the villagers in Dunggoan was a prominent personality called Ka Roman nicknamed ‘Duman’.He had two elder brothers. They were Ka Binonga and Ka Yongyong. Ka Binonga lived in the village across the bay now Brgy. Tapon, while Ka Yongyong was a native of Sitio Panlaan in the hinterland. Because of the village’s location, both farming and fishing are the main source of living for the three of them, just like the other inhabitants. Aside from farming, Ka Duman, however, was into ‘tuba’ (coconut wine) gathering. His ‘tuba’ was the favorite of the villagers because of its excellent taste and quality. It was very well patronized by both the fishing and farming villagers. No banquet would be complete without drinking Duman’s tuba. So great was its demand that Duman had to abandon his farm, and convert his land into a coconut plantation to produce more ‘tuba’.

His ‘tuba’ gathering activity would begin at dawn. The sound of his bamboo cleaners as he tapped these on the coconut palm served as a bell for the villagers to rise. His tip-tapping and its rhythmic beat marked the start of the day’s activities.

Ka Duman was a man of high esteem and integrity in the village. He was highly respected. He had good relations with his fellow villagers. The distinguishing feature in his personality was his tall height and big, loud, roaring voice.Whenever Ka Duman needed provisions for his basic consumption, he would shout at the top of his voice to call the attention of Ka Binonga. That roaring voluminous sound would echo in the entire village and as far across the bay to Tapon where Ka Binonga lived. Such loud echo was familiar and associated to be Ka Duman Dahunog’s, which became his pet name. ‘Dahunog’ means ‘roar’ and ‘dumadahunog’ ‘roaring like a thunder’.

Incidentally, there was a time when a Spanish officer visited Dunggoan. He heard the loud call of Ka Duman to Ka Binonga. The Spanish officer inquired from the villagers about the loud sound. The reply was it was that of Ka Duman-Dahunog.

Thereon, the place Dunggoan was preferably known as Kang Duman-Dahunog. However, Kang Duman-Dahunog was shortened to Duman-dahunog and eventually was changed to Dumanjug for better articulation.

 

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By: Ronaldo S. Tan (Other References: Legend of Dumanjug Town from the Dumanjug Town Fiesta Souvenir Program, 2001, in an interview conducted by the Girl Scouts of Cebu council during their Heritage Trail hike in 1960’s with the late Municipal Mayor Jose S. Macoy, Sr. and interview with Mrs. Cesaria “Saria” Macoy-Lim; ‘Dumanjug: Named after tuba gatherer’, 1995 by Aida S. Jumao-as; ‘History: Cebu’s 4 Cities and 49 Municipalities with Trimmed Account of Christianization of the Philippines’ by Gervasio L. Lavilles in 1965, Cebu; and other interviews.)